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Materials and Models for Greek Prose Composition Anonymous

Materials and Models for Greek Prose Composition

Anonymous

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230317359
Paperback
80 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1878 edition. Excerpt: ...but greater than theMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1878 edition. Excerpt: ...but greater than the buffalo. They have a horn upon their nose about a cubit long- this horn is solid, and cleft in the middle from one end to the other, and there is upon it white lines representing the figure of a man. The rhinoceros fights with the elephant, runs his horn into his belly, and carries him off upon his head- but the blood and the fat of the elephant running into his eyes, and making him blind, he falls to the ground- and then, strange to relate, the roc comes and carries them both away in her claws to be food for her young ones. Herodotus, i. 202- Hi. 106, sq., Ill- ii. 68, 71, 92- vii. 125. III. IN this island Minos reigned, who had a man of brass given to him (as some of the fablers say) by Vulcan. This man had one vein in his body, reaching from the neck to the heel, the end whereof was closed up with a brasen nail- his name was Talus- his custom was to run thrice about the island for the defence of it. When he saw the ship Argo pass by, he threw stones at it- but Medea, with her-magic, destroyed him. Some say that she slew him by potions, which made him mad- others, that, promising to make him immortal, she drew out the nail that stopped his vein, by which means all his blood ran out, and he died- others there are that say he was slain by Paean, who wounded him with an arrow in the heel. Herodotus, ii. 130- iv. 187. IV. I HEY understood, by the way, that their cholopey, or i-bond-slaves, whom they left at home, had in their absence possessed their towns, lands, houses, wives, and all. At which news, being somewhat amazed, and yet disdaining the villany of their servants, they made the more speed home- and so, not far from Novograd, met them in warlike manner marching against them. Whereupon, advising what was best...